Where are all the Weeds?

by Dee Hudson Photography

This prairie field has very few weeds because the steward that tends this unit has excellent weed management! I am part of this exceptional weed removal and I love the results!!! Look at the different beautiful plants blooming!! I see pink Pale Purple Coneflowers . . . yellow False Sunflowers . . . and white Quinine flowers.

The Prairie in Bloom at Nachusa Grasslands

The Prairie in bloom at Nachusa Grasslands.

One of my jobs as a volunteer steward at Nachusa Grasslands is to remove weeds from the prairie fields. For me, this is a familiar task. Growing up in rural Minnesota, my summers as a young girl were always spent helping my father remove the agricultural weeds from his soybean fields. At Nachusa Grasslands, I remove different weeds, but the process is one that is very familiar.

Red Clover Flower

Red Clover Flower

This summer, with the wettest June in Illinois history, one weed has really popped up in great numbers — the Red Clover (Trifolium pretense). The Red Clover is a non–native plant, first introduced in our country to provide food for farm animals. The purplish–pink flower head on the Red Clover is very pretty and one of the colors we scan for as we search for these weeds.

The Red Clover leaves have a light–colored

The Red Clover leaves have a light–colored “Chevron–shaped” pattern.

When the clover is not blooming, it is much trickier to find the plants and the hunt for the Red Clover becomes more like a ‘Where’s Waldo?’ exercise. Thank goodness the leaves are very distinctive! My steward taught me to look for the light colored ‘chevron–shape’ pattern on the leaves.

Jay Finds a Red Clover to Remove

Jay finds a Red Clover in his 2009 Gobbler Ridge planting.

Hello Jay! This is Jay Stacy, the land steward I regularly help and the steward of this prairie field (Gobbler Ridge) we are weed managing today. As we transect Jay’s 2009 prairie planting, we are mainly searching for Red Clover and Sweet Clover. The Red Clover flower heads are beginning to turn brown and if we do not remove them soon, the clover will begin to drop its seeds and then we will have many more to remove next year. In the photo above, Jay has located a Red Clover for removal.

Cutting the Red Clover With Scissors

The Red Clover is cut off close to the ground.

Jay gathers all the stems together first, which is tricky, because the stems tend to spread out into the surrounding prairie plants. Once all the stems have all been brought together, the clover is cut close to the ground.

Applying Herbicide to the Clover Stem

Jay carefully applies herbicide to the clover stem with a paintbrush.

Jay carefully applies herbicide to the clover stem with a paintbrush, being careful not to touch the brush to any of the nearby prairie plants.

Carrying the Red Clover from the Field

Jay transports the Red Clover seeds out of the prairie in a bucket.

This Red Clover plant has to be removed from the prairie so none of the seeds in the mature flower heads plant themselves. We collect the Red Clovers into a bucket and transport them completely out of the prairie to our central weed pile.

Red Clover Weeded from the Prairie

Red Clover collected in one morning.

Whew! Look at all the Red Clover we collected in one morning!! The clover fills the entire truck bed!

Red Clover Spreads

When Red Clover is left in a new prairie planting, it quickly multiplies.

This photo above illustrates what happens when the red clover is not weed managed. As you see, the clover quickly multiplies and begins to crowd out the natives plants and the plant diversity becomes lost — I mainly see Red Clover in the photo above. One of the reasons I love to photograph and explore the prairie at Nachusa Grasslands is to discover all the unique individual forb (flowering plants) and grass species that I never have the chance to see anywhere else.

When you are an ‘outdoor girl,’ there is nothing more satisfying than spending the day in a beautiful prairie searching for weeds. The work is physical, as you walk back and forth across the fields, constantly bending down to the ground to remove the weeds. However, there are some pretty ‘sweet’ rewards! While laboring, I pause to enjoy the raspy call of the Dickcissel (dick-dick-cissel) ,the call of the near–threatened Henslow’s Sparrow or I enjoy a quick glimpse of a Monarch Butterfly caterpillar on a milkweed.

Dickcissel, a grassland bird

A grassland bird called the Dickcissel.

Monarch Butterfly Caterpillar

Monarch Butterfly caterpillar on a Common Milkweed

Come visit the prairie at Nachusa Grasslands and enjoy the fruits of my labor and see what treasures you can find!!!

Dee Hudson Photography logo

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One thought on “Where are all the Weeds?

  1. really nice!

    i love the conversational tone while educating us!

    thanks!

    glad to receive your blog!!!!

    brava!

    be careful, you may become famous…

    take care. patsy

    Like

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